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March 15, 2011

9a Best of the Best

by marylambcoyne

Some very nice work from you, morning class 🙂
I am glad so many enjoyed the reading as much as I did.


Eva and Franco were attempting to convey some of the ridiculous movies that are made today. And the fact that very few people thought second about if this was a real movie or not plays right into that American movie ideology. Sometimes we get obsessed with the idea of things more than the actual thing itself. Take apple for instance many of you are so hypnotized, brainwashed, by apple-love that they could release the crappiest piece of junk on the market and still have their followers buying it up most eagerly.

Matthew Bergman

The main theme of Eva and Franco’s exhibition “It’s Always Six O’ Clock” is that culture can die when it is frozen into a cliche. Appropriation, plagiarism, remixing, culture jamming, and identity simulation continue to represent the core of the Mattes’ artistic strategy. They are trying to get people to understand that “nothing is original” nowadays. The concept of originality is none existent. Everything is remixed and reproduced to the point were nothing is original like it was before….When you remix something, it makes that piece more special and interesting. It makes the art seems special because it was worth remixing. Eva and Franco believe that the art nowadays all is the same and conforming to the world. We should aim to make it different and special. When you make a piece, you should leave behind your reality and time should halt.

<– Koren Fletcher


Eva and Franco’s Stolen Pieces project seems like fun. I’d be lying if I said I’ve never wanted to touch a piece in a gallery that bore the words “Do Not Touch” and Eva and Franco really haven’t helped this slight thought turn into a mini-obsession. If anything, I think that the art piece missing a piece gives it more character, more flare and therefore increses what it’s worth. Instead of being touched and contributed by one artist, it was touched by another. It’s been given two points of view instead of one. ……Sometimes, copies pose more contraversy and make a louder statement than their original. COPIES ARE MORE IMPORTANT THAN THEIR ORIGINAL, a reoccuring theme from when Eva and Franco stole Hell.com.

I think that unless the piece shows some kind of proof that it existed at one point, how do we really know of it’s true character?

Mariha Lowe

Interesting readings this week, I found them much more compelling than last weeks reading, and I think this was mostly due to the fact that it explained a bit more exactly what the Mattes intentions were in everything that they did. I felt like I had a bit more insight into their lives and their goals than I had before and it even made me stop and think “oh wow, so THAT’S what they were trying to accomplish, it totally worked!”

I don’t think that art diminishes in its value as time descends upon it or pieces go missing here and there from either theft or wear and tear of old age. I’m also thinking of art in a much broader sense than is mentioned here, as theater, film, and performances are pieces of art work as well. And those are almost always representations, unless you’re seeing the opening night of a new show it’s never the “original.” I believe art is somewhat similar as well, that once the piece is finished its replicated in the viewers eyes, and much like a performance the value of the art is always important and different, because its the interpretation that changes as well. I can’t think of a time when I watched the same play in different nights and thought yes I feel the exact same way I did before. Of course it’s going to be similar at times, but it’s never really the “original” condition-watching an artist create or paint the artwork to me is experience the art in its original.


Michelle Fenn

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